Rethinking Higher Education Classifications For Today’s Institutions

By: Alison Griffin This piece originally posted on Forbes on January 27, 2024. My 16-year-old son has a piece of paper, thumbtacked to his bedroom wall: a list of about 30 colleges and universities, carefully ordered alongside checkmarks and crosshatches. Upon first glance, the list wouldn’t make much sense to anyone, but perhaps another teenager. The way in which he has grouped colleges …

How Carnegie Classification Updates Could Affect State Higher Education Policy

By: Mushtaq Gunja and Sara Gast This piece originally posted on Education Commission of the States on January 27, 2024. Since 1973, the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education has served as the predominant framework to classify American colleges and universities. It was originally created for researchers as a way of organizing the higher education sector, but since the release over 50 …

AIR Newsletter Highlights Future of Carnegie Classifications

The Association for Institutional Research (AIR) featured a Q&A with Mushtaq Gunja and Sara Gast, executive director and deputy executive director, respectively, of the Carnegie Classifications in its August edition of the eAIR newsletter, which provides news to the higher education research community. Reimagining the Carnegie Classifications: A Q&A details the vision and purpose behind modernizing the classifications, plans for changes …

Carnegie Classifications Featured in Trusteeship Magazine

Mushtaq Gunja, executive director of Carnegie Classifications and senior vice president at the American Council on Education is featured in a Q&A in the May-June 2023 edition of Trusteeship Magazine, a publication for members of the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB). A Question for Mushtaq Gunja shares more about the plans ahead for the Carnegie Classifications and …